RT. HON. SIR WINSTON  SPENCER CHURCHILL

ROUND TABLE OF NEBRASKA

Barnes & Nobles Crossroads Mall

Omaha Nebraska, 68114

http://wrldhstry.com/

 

February 18th Sunday 2:00 pm

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9c/Sir_Winston_S_Churchill.jpg

 

Winston S. Churchill Volume V 1922-1939

Chapter 9 “The General Strike and the British Gazette

 

March 18th Sunday 2:00 pm

Winston S. Churchill Volume V 1922-1939

Chapter 10 “Tonight: Surrender: Tomorrow Magnanimity”

 

Recommended Magazines

 

* Finest Hour ‘Journal of the Churchill Centre’ http://winstonchurchill.org/

* The Churchillian ‘The Magazine Of The National Churchill Museum’ http://www.nationalchurchillmuseum.org/

* The Great War http://www.greatnorthernpublishing.co.uk/the-great-war.html

* World War II http://www.historynet.com/worldwar2

* This England https://www.thisengland.co.uk/

 

Churchill on the Radio

3rd Hour of the Hugh Hewitt radio show on each Friday

If in Omaha, NE this segment is aired from 7am to 8am on AM 1420 and 94.5 FM

Broadcast are also available for free on ITUNES ‘Hillsdale Dialogues Podcast’

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/hillsdale-dialogues-podcast/id663872027?mt=2

 

Churchill Chat

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/churchillchat

 

November 28, 1925

Opera House, Tunbridge Wells, England

 

Did she fall or was she pushed?

 

Satellite image of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in April 2002.jpg

Satellite image of Great Britain in April 2002

 

Churchill is speaking at a Conservative and Unionist Demonstration.

 

Excerpt from Robert Rhodes James’ ‘Winston S. Churchill His Complete Speeches 1897-1963 Volume IV 1922-1928’ (1974, Page 3785)

 

The Socialist in his folly, and the Communist in his malice, would undermine and fatally wreck the pillars of our national prosperity. (Cheers). What is the difference between the Socialist and the Communist? They both wish to go along the same road. They both wish to go equally far along the same road. They wish to go as fast as possible along the same road, but the Communist thinks he can smash his way through by violence, and the Socialist believes he can do it by humbug. (Laughter) The object of the Socialist and the Communist is the same, and the consequences of their policy, if adopted, would be the same. I draw no distinction in theory between the evolution or gradual Socialism and the revolution or violent Socialism. The theories of that remarkable German, Karl Marx, if put into practice, would finally and fatally destroy the liberty and prosperity of these islands, and whether our ruin is reached by a violent blow or by the administration in subtle doses of slow poison is no doubt an important matter, but still only a secondary matter. Britain would be laid low and the only question at the post-mortem would be the old question, so often asked on those occasions, ”Did she fall or was she pushed?” (Laughter) If I were asked the difference between Socialism and Communism I could only reply that the Socialist tried to lead us to disaster by foolish words, and the Communist wished to drive us there by violent deeds. We must show ourselves equally capable of meeting them and beating them whether it is a matter of words or deeds.

 

February 4, 1926

London, England

 

They are nearly all teetotalers and non-smokers. I suppose this is what makes them such stern politicians.

 

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Portrait of James Craig

 

Winston Churchill as Chancellor of the Exchequer is responsible for budget allocations. Here in a letter to his wife Clementine in which he describes a meeting with James Craig and others over allocations for Unemployment Insurance.

 

Excerpt is from Martin Gilbert’s The Churchill Documents Volume 11 The Exchequer Years 1922 – 1929 (1979, Pages 643)

 

I had an awful tussle with 1Craig and Co about their Unemployment Insurance. I had promised them 650,000 for this year, and they sent in a bill for 1,300,000 owing to the fact that their estimate on which our previous agreement was based were all wrong. They stood on the agreement, and I stood on the 650,000. We had some very troublesome interviews, but in the end they behaved extremely well and accepted my point of view with good grace. Indeed I think they were quite chivalrous, because they had a sort of case against me on the letter though not in the spirit of our relations.

 

I got them all four to dine at Downing Street last night before coming down here. They are nearly all teetotalers and non-smokers. I suppose this is what makes them such stern politicians.

 

1James Craig, 1871–1940. A Protestant. Born in Dublin, the son of a wealthy distiller. A stockbroker by profession. Served in the South African War, 1899–1902. Unionist MP, 1906–21. A leading opponent of Irish Home Rule before 1914. On active service against the Germans in South-west Africa, 1914–15. Created Baronet, 1918. Parliamentary Secretary, Ministry of Pensions, 1919–20. Financial Secretary, Admiralty, 1920–21. First Prime Minister of Northern Ireland (under the Government of Ireland Act), from June 1921 until his death . Created Viscount Craigavon, 1927.

 

 

May 6, 1926

England

 

The Chancellor occupied the attention of practically the whole of the staff who normally would have been thinking out the details

 

The British Gazette No 2.jpg

Front page of issue 2 of The British Gazette, a newspaper published by the British Government during the 1926 United Kingdom general strike.

 

In 1926 the Printers in Great Britain went on strike; this prevented Newspapers from being printed adequately. During this brief time period the government published the British Gazette. The Editor of the British Gazette was Churchill himself. As you see below he was sometimes an overzealous Editor at times.

 

Excerpt from Martin Gilbert’s ‘Winston S. Churchill Volume V 1922-1939’ (1976, Pages 159-160)

 

The May 6 issue of the British Gazette sold more than half a million copies, twice the sales of the previous day, at a penny each. That morning Sir Philip Sassoon telegraphed to Hoare from Cambridge that the paper ‘has impressed & heartened people all over the country enormously’. The extra work required for so rapid an increase in both production and distribution led to strains among the staff, and there was some resentment at Churchill’s constant supervision and exhortation. Gwynne wanted the Government’s control to come through one source alone, preferably Davidson, and on May 6 he protested to Davidson about the continued division of authority. Davidson at once wrote angrily to Baldwin, explaining the cause of Gwynne’s discontent, and criticizing Churchill’s activities:

 

The failure to some extent in the details of distribution of the British Gazette has been due entirely to the fact that the Chancellor occupied the attention of practically the whole of the staff who normally would have been thinking out the details. Of course he was anxious, but it was unfortunate that he tried so persistently to force a scratch staff beyond its capacity.

 

So long as he does not come to the Morning Post offices again tonight the staff will be able to do what it is there to do, viz organizing the printing, the production and distribution of the Gazette.

 

 I must depend on you, and the staff are relying on me, to find some means of preventing his coming. By all means let him put what pressure he can personally upon Sir Malcolm Fraser, who is in general control, and the Stationery Office, by interview or letter, but the technical staff should be left to do their job. He rattled them badly last night.

 

He thinks he is Napoleon, but curiously enough the men who have been printing all their life in the various processes happen to know more about their job than he does.

 

Short Biographies of Winston Churchill’s Contemporaries

 

He was killed in action on the north-west frontier of India, a year after leaving St. Paul’s School: at St. Paul’s he was commemorated in a stained glass window that was destroyed in the Blitz.

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/af/ChurchilMalakand.jpgBlack and white image of St Paul's Cathedral while London burns 

(left)The outpost in the north-west frontier in India from which Winston Churchill and Ernest Wilson saw action in the summer of 1897.

(right) St Paul's Cathedral is bombed 29/30 December 1940.

 

Bio is from Martin Gilbert’s The Churchill Documents Volume 11 The Exchequer Years 1922 – 1929 (1979, Pages 659)

 

Ernest Orme Wilson, 1879-97. He was killed in action on the north-west frontier of India, a year after leaving St. Paul’s School: at St. Paul’s he was commemorated in a stained glass window that was destroyed in the Blitz. Churchill, who fought in the same action, had written to his own mother. Lady Randolph Churchill (on September 1897): ‘I have faith in my star—that is that I am intended to do something in the world. If I am mistaken—what does it matter? My life has been a pleasant one and though I should regret to leave it—it would be a regret that perhaps I should never know”.

 

 

He was assassinated by a man calling himself a ‘Russian Fascist’ on 7 May 1932. Doumer had lost four sons in the Great War.

 

Paul Doumer 1931.jpg

French statesman Paul Doumer (1857-1932) as president of the Senate in 1931.

 

In February of 1926 Paul Doumer the Minister of Finance of France amd Winston Churchill worked to together on paying war debt.

 

Bio is from Martin Gilbert’s The Churchill Documents Volume 11 The Exchequer Years 1922 – 1929 (1979, Pages 637)

 

Paul Doumer, 1857-1932. Son of a railway foreman. Professor of Mathematics, 1879. In the first year of his professorship he took up journalism, and founded the Tribune de Aisne, a radical newspaper. Entered politics in 1888. Minister of Finance, 1895. In 1896 he guided the first French income tax through the Chamber of Deputies, but the Senate refused to pass it. Governor-General of Indo-China, 1897-1902. President of the Chamber of Deputies, 1905. Member of the Senate, 1912-25. Minister of Finance, 16 December 1925 to 9 March 1926. President of the Senate, 1927; of the French Republic, 1931. He was assassinated by a man calling himself a ‘Russian Fascist’ on 7 May 1932. Doumer had lost four sons in the Great War.