RT. HON. SIR WINSTON  SPENCER CHURCHILL

ROUND TABLE OF NEBRASKA

Barnes & Nobles Crossroads Mall

Omaha Nebraska, 68114

http://wrldhstry.com/

 

November 19th Sunday 2:00 pm

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9c/Sir_Winston_S_Churchill.jpg

 

Winston S. Churchill Volume V 1922-1939

Chapter 6 “Preparing the 1925 Budget: ’Keeping His Nose to the Grindstone’”

 

December 17th Sunday 2:00 pm

 Winston S. Churchill Volume V 1922-1939

Chapter 7 “Churchill’s First Budget: ’The Appeasement of Class Bitterness’”

 

Recommended Magazines

 

* Finest Hour ‘Journal of the Churchill Centre’ http://winstonchurchill.org/

* The Churchillian ‘The Magazine Of The National Churchill Museum’ http://www.nationalchurchillmuseum.org/

* The Great War http://www.greatnorthernpublishing.co.uk/the-great-war.html

* World War II http://www.historynet.com/worldwar2

* This England https://www.thisengland.co.uk/

 

Churchill on the Radio

3rd Hour of the Hugh Hewitt radio show on each Friday

If in Omaha, NE this segment is aired from 7am to 8am on AM 1420 and 94.5 FM

Broadcast are also available for free on ITUNES ‘Hillsdale Dialogues Podcast’

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/hillsdale-dialogues-podcast/id663872027?mt=2

 

Churchill Chat

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/churchillchat

 

March 24, 1925

London, England

 

It is at least paradoxical that the Royal Mint should be stamping coins with revolutionary emblems for the use of a Government pledged to the destruction of all Monarchies and the existing civilization. Certainly it is a commercially minded incident.

 

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1924 half-rouble piece

 

 Letter is from Martin Gilbert’s The Churchill Documents Volume 11 The Exchequer Years 1922 – 1929 (1979, Page 448)

 

Winston S. Churchill: departmental note

 

24 March 1925

 

ROYAL MINT ISSUE OF SOVIET COINS1

 

Let me see the papers of the original decision to allow them to coin silver and copper. What are the designs of the coins and the translation of any inscriptions upon them? What is the amount of money and the profit involved in the silver and copper coinage? What is the profit involved in the proposed deal?

 

The policy of the late Government was to give the utmost countenance to the Soviets. That is certainly not the policy of the present Administration. It is at least paradoxical that the Royal Mint should be stamping coins with revolutionary emblems for the use of a Government pledged to the destruction of all Monarchies and the existing civilization. Certainly it is a commercially minded incident.

 

1In 1924 the Leningrad Mint approached the Royal Mint for help in supplying coins for Soviet Russia, designed to replace the paper money then in circulation. By the end of the year the Royal Mint had struck 40 million half-rouble pieces in fine silver. The Soviet Government provided the silver bullion for these coins; it was valued at 1,600,000. A further million copper five-copeck pieces were also struck in the Royal Mint. In its annual report for 1924 the Royal Mint pointed out that these coinages ‘enable the works to be continually engaged throughout the year’. In addition, as the Soviet lettering was new to the Mint, it ‘afforded valuable experience for the Department’. Both coins showed the Arms of the Soviet Union on one side. On the reverse of the half-rouble was a smith at work forging metal. On the reverse of the five-copeck was an ornament composed of ears of barley.